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2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
administration. in our opinion, government data must be published and must be publishing an useful that means it has to be standardized, machine-readable and up until now, we haven't done a very good job with that. does someone have a phone? up until now we haven't done a good job with the publication. what is our view of what the obama administration has accomplished in his first four years? has the administration made strides towards publishing the government data? yes, absolutely. has the administration published the most valuable government data? now. the data from the core of government, the information that staff members at executive branch agencies reliant to make their decision has not been published. our coalition think says government in five categories. the transparency community we spend time categorizing beautiful policy categorization, so i won't spend too much time on this. broadly speaking the outside but it's usually talk about. spending, management and performance, regulation, legislation and judicial documents. in each case, certain data is at the core of government, the me
as broadband and broadcast. >> host: senator gordon smith joins us as we began discussions on the future of television and he is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. thank you, sir. and ted gotsch from telecommunications report thank you for being on "the communicators." >> this week on q&a, pulitzer prize-winning author anne applebaum discusses her newest historical narrative entitled "iron curtain" subfive. c-span: anne applebaum why do you open up with the quote from winston churchill? >> guest: i open up of the quote because churchill is defined an era where talking about probably without meaning to. he coined the expression the iron curtain and it was such a motive and such, and such an evocative description of what had happened between 1944 and 1946 when he gave his speech that the quote comes from and i thought it was important to put that at the beginning of the book. c-span: did you ever find out why he called at the iron iron iron curtain? guess so there's x. a long and complicated story. it's actually a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain at t
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4